Blogs

Announcing the Lobos Corona Parklands - the next great parks and conservation landscape

Heads of the Big Sur Land Trust, Monterey Peninsula Regional Parks District, the Point Lobos Foundation and the Monterey District of California State Parks signed a memorandum of understanding on April 9 to further parks between Carmel and Big Sur.

Otters, otters, and more otters

My public walk group, which consisted of one couple from Grass Valley and three trainee "shadows", had no idea what was in store for them when we set out on the Cypress Grove Trail on Friday.  It started slowly enough with two otters in Headland Cove; they were a bit difficult to see but good enough to avoid giving the visitors a full refund for the tour.  Then we saw a mom and pup and another individual not far from South Point, and a raft of about a dozen further out.  Next we saw three more otters motoring along near the Pinnacle.

A docent trainee's favorite things

As part of my Docent training I’ve been attending topical guided walks, station openings and closings and just walking the trails. There are many wonderful things to see at Point Lobos but my favorite images are the smiles that stretch the faces of so many visitors. The beauty of the Reserve is almost irresistible and very few folks can spend a few hours walking the trails and not leave the cares of their daily lives behind. The same is true for me and that’s why I look forward to the hours I spend at Point Lobos.  by Jack Olver

Great White Shark sighting

Ranger Dan forwarded a diver's Flicker postings of a dive to Marco's Pinnacle (just outside Bluefish Cove).  Some great photos, plus some short videos.  The video where the diver comes up over a rock and the Great White swims by is breathtaking (and the diver's breathing on the video never changes!)  It's in the 3rd row of pictures and titled "Great White Shark edit".

Four otters seen on island

I had a great time scoping at Bird Island this morning.  I have previously seen otters hauled out here and there at Point Lobos before, but was amazed this morning to see FOUR otters hauled out together on a rock just north of Bird Island.  There were two moms and their pups!  They were on the rock for quite a while before a pesky Western Gull pestered them past their tolerance level, and they headed into the water.  The white faces of the moms are clearly evident in the photo.

Wildflowers, Wildlife, Wine and Lunch

Members at the Gray Whale level and above are invited to join us on Saturday, May 17th for the annual Wildflower, Wildlife, Wine and Lunch event at San Jose Creek Canyon. Closed to the public, this is one of the most idyllic landscapes in Carmel. It's located on the north end of AM Allen Ranch, or Point Lobos East, and consists of a steep canyon lined with wildflowers. See photos.

Precious moment at Point Lobos

A memorable experience happened when a six year old Japanese boy shyly walked up the trail where I had a scope set up during an Easy Access Adventure. With the scope adjusted to its lowest height, I got down on one knee to get face to face with this young man. I told him this scope is set up just for people his size, and then asked him if he could say harbor seal. The child looked up at his Dad and his father said go ahead. "Harbor seal" he said with a smile on his face, his parents gleaming.

Precious moment at Point Lobos

A memorable experience happened when a six year old Japanese boy shyly walked up the trail where had a scope set up during an Easy Access adventure. With the scope adjusted to its lowest height, I got down on one knee to get face to face with this young man. I told him this scope is set up just for people his size, and then asked him if he could say harbor seal, the child looked up at his Dad and his father said go ahead. "Harbor seal" he said with a smile on his face, his parents gleaming.

Rafts of otters and mating cormorants

"Yesterday (Sunday, Feb 23) I took the scope to the Pelican Island lookout because a photographer with a long lens camera reported there were 20+ otters in the kelp beds just south of the lookout.  No, I didn't get an accurate count!  They kept rolling and changing places, but there were two large rafts of at least 20 otters.  Visitors enjoyed viewing the otters and the cormorants on the rock in the foreground who totally ignored our talking and exclamations and kept very focused on thier mating rituals.